Glenwood Springs, CO (GSC)

Constructed of brick and Frying Pan River red sandstone, the depot is best known for its medieval-inspired towers with pyramidal roofs. Glenwood Springs is a gateway to the famous Aspen ski area.

413 7th Street
Glenwood Springs, CO 81601

Station Hours

Annual Station Revenue (2016): $3,602,855
Annual Station Ridership (2016): 46,818
  • Facility Ownership: Union Pacific Railroad
  • Parking Lot Ownership: N/A
  • Platform Ownership: Union Pacific Railroad
  • Track Ownership: Union Pacific Railroad

Rob Eaton
Regional Contact
governmentaffairssea@amtrak.com
For information about Amtrak fares and schedules, please call 1-800-USA-RAIL (1-800-872-7245).

The present Glenwood Springs depot officially opened on June 18, 1904 and was built by the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad (D&RGW). It replaced an earlier, smaller structure located approximately three blocks west at the north end of Pitkin Avenue. The D&RGW began service to the young community in late 1887 and advertised its route through Glenwood Canyon as the “Scenic Line of the World.” Stretching for approximately 13 miles and with walls as high as 1,300 feet, the canyon is a famed natural wonder.

The Romanesque Revival style depot exhibits aesthetic similarities to the Hot Springs Lodge on the north shore of the Colorado River. Constructed of Frying Pan River red sandstone and reddish-brown brick, it has a prominent jerkinhead cross gable flanked by medieval-inspired towers sporting pyramidal roofs. Passengers entering from 7th Street descend an elegant staircase leading to the ticket office. From this lobby area, great arched openings originally led to two waiting rooms – one for women and children on the east side and one for men to the west. The far ends of the building housed the express office and baggage room. Interior spaces still feature rich wood wainscot on the lowest third of the walls.

Through various restorations, most recently in 1990, architects restored the depot’s original tile roofing and retained the long oak benches. In September 2003, the Glenwood Railroad Museum opened in the old Ladies’ Waiting Room. Exhibits tell the story of railroading in the Roaring Fork River Valley and include a large scale model railroad, photographs and artifacts such as a semaphore. The museum uses about one-third of the station while Amtrak actively uses the other two-thirds.

Glenwood Springs was first settled by James Landis in 1879, and was platted and incorporated on August 25, 1885. With the completion of the first class Hotel Colorado and the growing fame of the town’s warm mineral springs, the community established itself as a resort destination. For centuries, the Ute people had used the springs for therapeutic and ceremonial purposes.

The Glenwood Hot Springs Pool remains the largest natural hot springs pool in the world, and has drawn visitors including presidents William Howard Taft and Theodore Roosevelt. John Henry “Doc” Holliday, the infamous gunslinger, is buried in Glenwood Springs. The town is also a gateway to the popular Aspen ski area, 40 miles to the south.

Amtrak provides ticketing and baggage services at this station, which is served by two daily trains.

Features

  • Accessible Platform
  • Accessible Restrooms
  • Accessible Ticket Office
  • Accessible Waiting Room
  • Accessible Water Fountain
  • Baggage Storage
  • Bike Boxes
  • Checked Baggage
  • Enclosed Waiting Area
  • Help With Luggage
  • Long Term Parking Spaces
  • Pay Phones
  • Restrooms
  • Shipping Boxes
  • Short Term Parking Spaces
  • Ski Bags
  • Ticket Office
  • Wheelchair
  • Wheelchair Lift