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Paso Robles, CA (PRB)


Station Facts

Paso Robles, CA Station Photo

Paso Robles, California

800 Pine Street Paso Robles Intermodal Station Paso Robles, CA 93446

Station Hours

Annual Station Revenue (2014)
$662,441
Annual Station Ridership (2014)
12,065

Ownerships

Facility Ownership City of Paso Robles
Parking Lot Ownership City of Paso Robles
Platform Ownership Union Pacific Railroad
Track Ownership Union Pacific Railroad

Features

10 Long Term Parking Spaces 10 Short Term Parking Spaces Accessible Platform
Accessible Restrooms Accessible Water Fountain Dedicated Parking
Enclosed Waiting Area Pay Phones Restrooms
Wheelchair Lift

Routes Served

  • Coast Starlight

Contact

Alex Khalfin
Regional Contact
governmentaffairsoak@amtrak.com
For information about Amtrak fares and schedules, please call 1-800-USA-RAIL (1-800-872-7245).

Local Community Links:

Station History

The Paso Robles transportation center was built in 1998, next to the original restored depot which now houses small retail shops. The center includes space for Amtrak, intercity buses, car rental agencies and local and regional buses. Paso Robles’ Main Street Program has made an effort to include the facility and surrounding businesses in an ongoing renewal project.

The central coast area which became Paso Robles was known for its curative hot springs even before the Spanish Missions. A 25,600-acre land grant, the Rancho del Paso de Robles, was made originally to Pedro Narvaez; in 1857, the entire rancho was purchased by James H. Blackburn, Daniel Drew Blackburn, and Lazarus Godehaux for $8,000. The original site of Father Juan Cabot’s log shanty was eventually replaced by the first bathhouse in 1864, and later by the first hotel, Hotel El Paso de Robles, which opened in 1891.

After the Southern Pacific Railroad arrived in the town on October 31, 1886, work began on laying out a town site around the existing resort at the springs, and two weeks later, a three-day celebration was held, bringing a train of prospective buyers from San Francisco. Following those tours, 228, 228 lots were sold at auction on November 17, 1886. The city incorporated in 1889.

Construction on a magnificent new resort hotel began in 1889 for the princely sum of $160,000. The hotel was three stories tall and built of solid masonry. It featured a seven-acre garden, nine-hole golf course, library, beauty salon, and an improved hot springs plunge bath as well as 32 individual baths.

In 1913 the renowned concert pianist Ignace Paderewski came for a successful treatment of his arthritis at the springs. He kept a private car with a piano at the train station, and townspeople would gather there to hear him play in the evenings. After resuming his concert tour, he returned to live at the hotel and bought two ranches just west of the city.

Paso Robles was once known as Almond City because local almond-growers in the early 20th century created nearby the largest concentration of almond orchards in the world. Cattle and horse ranches, wheat, barley, garden produce, fruit and nut orchards have been economically important to the city. Today, much of this land is devoted to the wineries and vineyards that draw tourists to the area, as wine grapes have been grown in the locale since the Spanish first brought them in 1797.

Amtrak does not provide ticketing or baggage services at this facility.

Paso Robles is served by two daily trains.