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Lamy, NM (LMY)


Station Facts

Lamy, NM Station Photo

Lamy, New Mexico

Santa Fe County Road 33 152 Old Lamy Trail Lamy, NM 87540

Station Hours

Annual Station Revenue (2013)
$1,791,100
Annual Station Ridership (2013)
12,551

Ownerships

Facility Ownership Santa Fe Southern Railway, Inc.
Parking Lot Ownership SFS Land Holding, Ltd.
Platform Ownership New Mexico Department of Transportation
Track Ownership New Mexico Department of Transportation

Features

Accessible Platform Accessible Waiting Room Baggage Storage
Bike Boxes Checked Baggage Dedicated Parking
Enclosed Waiting Area Pay Phones Restrooms
Shipping Boxes Ski Bags Ticket Office
Wheelchair Lift

Routes Served

  • Southwest Chief

Contact

Jonathan Hutchison
Regional Contact
governmentaffairsoak@amtrak.com
For information about Amtrak fares and schedules, please call 1-800-USA-RAIL (1-800-872-7245).

Local Community Links:

Station History

The Amtrak station in Lamy was built in the 1880s of stucco and brick in the California Mission-style by the Atcheson, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (now BNSF Railway). The station building is used by Amtrak, Santa Fe Southern (SFS), and a restaurant owner who subleases space in the bulding from SFS for his kitchen.  SFS also rents the lobby for private events outside Amtrak's hours of operation.

Lamy’s original name was Galisteo Junction. It was later changed to Lamy in honor of Jean- Baptiste Lamy, the first archbishop of the American Territorial period. He brought some structure and religion to the region and played a major role in the development of the region.

The Santa Fe originally planned to run from Atchison, Kansas to Santa Fe and then west. As the track building continued into New Mexico, the civil engineers realized that the terrain around Santa Fe made this an impossible undertaking. The line was built through Lamy instead, and a spur line was built from Lamy to Santa Fe. Fred Harvey chose to build a luxury hotel here, El Ortiz, and it remained open until 1942.

The growth of the railroad industry resulted in the same development in Lamy, but as the industry declined so did the need for railroad workers in this area and the population suffered. Today, Lamy is a lovely small village and the station is the transfer point for passengers going to Santa Fe or Los Alamos.

Amtrak provides ticketing and baggage services at this facility, which is served by two daily trains.