AMTRAK® PRESENTS

Great American Stations

Helping communities discover and develop the
economic power of America's train stations.

Start Your Station Project

Garden City, KS (GCK)

Located in the fertile lands bordering the Arkansas River, Garden City lives up to its name as an agricultural center known for generous wheat, sugar beet and alfalfa crops.


Station Facts

Garden City, KS Station Photo

Garden City, Kansas

100 North 7th Street One block south of 7th/Fulton (Bus. Hwy. 50) Garden City, KS 67846

Station Hours

Annual Station Revenue (2013)
$800,411
Annual Station Ridership (2013)
7,355

Ownerships

Facility Ownership City of Garden City
Parking Lot Ownership City of Garden City
Platform Ownership BNSF Railway
Track Ownership BNSF Railway

Features

38 Long Term Parking Spaces Accessible Platform Accessible Restrooms
Accessible Waiting Room Accessible Water Fountain Dedicated Parking
Enclosed Waiting Area Help With Luggage Restrooms
Short Term Parking Spaces Ticket Office Wheelchair Lift

Routes Served

  • Southwest Chief

Contact

Derrick James
Regional Contact
governmentaffairschi@amtrak.com
For information about Amtrak fares and schedules, please call 1-800-USA-RAIL (1-800-872-7245).

Local Community Links:

Station History

The current Amtrak station in Garden City was built in 1907. This hip-roofed brick structure, with its hexagonal bay dormers, wide roof and decorative glass, was remodeled in 1957; and renovated again in 2002. Its 600-foot long gated platform is protected by wrought-iron fencing. The city has access to the building for civic and social events. Funding for this $810,000 renovation was supplied both by the city ($160,000) and federal grants.

Although the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad (now BNSF Railway) already passed through that area, there was no depot or stop when the city was founded. Mail was sent in those early days by means of holding it up on a hook for the trainmen to catch. In 1879, the settlers organized formally as a town and reached an agreement with the railroad to stop there, at which time the town was resurveyed. By May 1, 1879, a wooden frame station house was shipped in from Topeka, and a depot installed in Garden City. In 1885, the depot and freight office were moved to the north side of the tracks, and later added to. However, in August of 1890, this depot was destroyed by fire; a temporary depot was erected and the permanent station was built.

Garden City is located on the prairie, in the fertile river bottom along the Arkansas River in southwestern Kansas; it is also the seat for Finney County.

As with many towns in its day, Garden City sprang up along the railroad line as farmers moved west, busting sod and planting crops. In February of 1878, the Fulton family together with Charles van Trump, the county surveyor, arrived at the site of present-day Garden City, and in March of 1878, presented their claims to the United States Land office. The name of Garden City was proposed because of the lush irrigated garden the Fultons grew, allegedly to spite the cattlemen who opposed the settlement of range lands there.

Garden City today is one of western Kansas’ largest cities, a trade center in a heavily irrigated farm and dairy region growing wheat, sugar beets and alfalfa. It has a gas and an oil field, cattle feedlots, and hide-processing and meat-packing plants. Its manufacturing plants produce farm machinery, cultured marble, and fertilizers. The city also boasts an agricultural experiment station, the Lee Richardson Zoo, and the Sandsage Bison Refuge and Wildlife Area. Author Truman Capote temporarily resided in Garden City and traveled here by train in order to cover trials described in his best-selling book, In Cold Blood.

Amtrak provides ticketing and baggage services at this station, which is served by two daily trains.